The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee

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Title: The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

Author: Mackenzi Lee

Pages: 501

Publisher: Katherine Tiegen Books (Harper in UK)

Published: 2017

Source: Bought

Rating: ★★★★


Henry “Monty” Montague was born and bred to be a gentleman, but he was never one to be tamed. The finest boarding schools in England and the constant disapproval of his father haven’t been able to curb any of his roguish passions—not for gambling halls, late nights spent with a bottle of spirits, or waking up in the arms of women or men.

But as Monty embarks on his Grand Tour of Europe, his quest for a life filled with pleasure and vice is in danger of coming to an end. Not only does his father expect him to take over the family’s estate upon his return, but Monty is also nursing an impossible crush on his best friend and traveling companion, Percy.

Still it isn’t in Monty’s nature to give up. Even with his younger sister, Felicity, in tow, he vows to make this yearlong escapade one last hedonistic hurrah and flirt with Percy from Paris to Rome. But when one of Monty’s reckless decisions turns their trip abroad into a harrowing manhunt that spans across Europe, it calls into question everything he knows, including his relationship with the boy he adores.


A Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue has been on my TBR list pretty much ever since its release into the wild (aka the book community). I’ve heard so many great things about this book and seen so much praise surrounding it since its release and so in September, I decided it was about time I picked it up.

Having been on a ‘tour’ of Europe myself in Summer 2017, I was quite excited to explore the topic of a European tour in a more historic setting. I was happy to see that a map had been included featuring the tour stops and felt that this was a good addition to the book.

The plot was an interesting one. I can easily see how people who have read this previously have got caught up in it. The Gentleman’s Guide follows Monty, Percy and Felicity as the take a tour through Europe that goes a liiiiittle bit wrong, thanks to Monty!

Henry ‘Monty’ Montague is our main character and at first, I found myself getting a little frustrated with him even though I did find him to be quite funny. I found myself getting frustrated with him because I felt that he thought about himself a lot and didn’t consider others at times. I think that this changed throughout the book and we saw some good character development with him. I could sympathise with his want to be young and to his true self without his family’s reputation hanging over his head constantly.

Percy is Monty’s best friend who goes on the tour as Monty’s companion. They have a close relationship which is demonstrated throughout the book. Percy’s character is a likeable one that I enjoyed reading about.

Felicity was a good side character with some witty remarks and with a skill for medicine. I liked Felicity’s character in this one and look forward to hearing her story in the sequel, The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy.

I thought that the ending of The Gentleman’s Guide was a good close to the book and was quite satisfying.

Although it took me a while to read this book ( I think it was something like 1-2 months), that doesn’t reflect how I felt about this book as I did enjoy it and thought it was a good historical read. It had a good combination of some humour but also some seriousness in it.

I’m glad that I’ve finally read The Gentleman’s Guide even if it did take me a while to get to it. I’m looking forward to reading The Lady’s Guide soon, although I have seen some not so good feedback which is sad seeing as so many people enjoyed The Gentleman’s Guide!

If you’re looking for a diverse, historical read, I would definitely recommend this one!